Thursday, November 14, 2013

Patient Navigation Grows Through the Years

Image courtesy of Supertrooper at FreeDigitalPhotos.net
If you’re uninsured and the doctor says you need a biopsy and you’re out there by yourself, you could easily get lost in the healthcare system. Of the uninsured people that are served by the center [Ralph Lauren Center for Cancer Care and Prevention], the Patient Navigator is able to successfully obtain insurance coverage for 95 percent of them so they can go ahead with their surgery ~ Dr. Harold P. Freeman, Oncology Issues - November/December 2004
patient navigation model has been expanded to include the timely movement of an individual across the entire health care continuum from prevention, detection, diagnosis, treatment, and supportive, to end-of-life care - See more at: http://www.hpfreemanpni.org/our-model/#sthash.Ul5qu6dj.dpuf
patient navigation model has been expanded to include the timely movement of an individual across the entire health care continuum from prevention, detection, diagnosis, treatment, and supportive, to end-of-life care. - See more at: http://www.hpfreemanpni.org/our-model/#sthash.Ul5qu6dj.dpuf
patient navigation model has been expanded to include the timely movement of an individual across the entire health care continuum from prevention, detection, diagnosis, treatment, and supportive, to end-of-life care. - See more at: http://www.hpfreemanpni.org/our-model/#sthash.Ul5qu6dj.dpuf
Fourteen years ago, the Patient Navigation seed was planted. Dr. Freeman has made it his life's mission to serve the underserved and to remove all barriers to care for those with chronic diseases, and since 2007 (birth year for HPFPNI), graduates of the Institute continue with this mission on a daily basis. Patient Navigation is not a new concept, rather it is a growing concept, strengthening its roots, growing branches, sprouting new leaves throughout the years. 

It is important to note that the above quote from Dr. Freeman was taken from an article written back in 2004. One of the myriad barriers to healthcare for those battling chronic diseases has always been the financial aspect, and certified Patient Navigators have expertly guided patients through the intricate insurance maze since Patient Navigation took root. Financial Navigation, Nurse Navigation, Community Navigation... the list goes on for the many roles that Patient Navigators can play.

The Harold P. Freeman Patient Navigation Institute continues to plant new seeds of knowledge by certifying hundreds of Patient Navigators each year and by consistently finding like-minded corporations and associations with which to synergize and create even stronger roots. As Patient Navigation gets older, it gets stronger. Barriers to care are broken daily. Thanks to our Navigators, today:
  • Transportation will be arranged.
  • Daycare will be found.
  • Insurance coverage will be obtained.
  • Communication and language hurdles will be cleared.
  • Clinical questions will be answered.
  • Doctors will be reached.
  • Appointments will be met.
  • Navigation technology will create more opportunity.
  • Lives will be saved.
 
He who plants a tree
Plants a hope
~ Lucy Larcom
 
 

Friday, November 1, 2013

A Letter


Starting Pointe Consultants
PO Box 12124
Raleigh, NC 27605


October 17, 2013

Dr. Harold P. Freeman
Harold P. Freeman Patient Navigation Institute
55 Exchange Place
Suite 405
New York, NY 10005-3304

Dear Dr. Freeman:
In October 2009, I attended the Freeman Patient Navigation Institute. The experience was one that continues to resonate within my heart and challenges me to look for strategies to serve my state’s most underserved communities. The Navigation model set forth by you and your staff recognizes the value of providing support to individuals at each point in the cancer care continuum. The training program at the Freeman Patient Navigation Institute provided me with a clear focus on supporting individuals before they enter into the formal healthcare system.
At the time of the training, I was engaged in developing a training curriculum for prostate health lay leaders (PC Ambassadors) in North Carolina. The objective of the PC Ambassadors’ work is to educate the public on the incidence, screening and treatment of prostate cancer. To date, 50 men and women from diverse walks of life and experiences have successfully completed the training and are working in every region of the state. An expanded version of the training was made possible through a grant from the National Cancer Institute to the University of North Carolina – Chapel Hill. This group continues to provide support for training PC Ambassadors in rural North Carolina communities.
I am deeply thankful for the information acquired through the Freeman Patient Navigation Institute. The inspiration you provided was both inviting and infectious. I remain eternally indebted to you as a trailblazer in a field that has emerged as a positive step to address health disparities.
As we move forward, I will keep you informed of our work. I look forward to your visit to North Carolina; here you will meet those whom I consider an extension of your love for humanity.
Sincerely,
Alan Richmond, MSW